Dermalrolling vs. Medical Microneedling: The Differences Explained

TGIF y’all! This is a topic I have been meaning to write about for quite some time because there is a LOT of confusion around it! Let’s just jump in.

This is NOT a medical microneedling device. This is a dermal roller. (Above)

If you have this roller at home, that’s great! The needle depths are hypodermic which means they just skin the stratum corneum or top layer of the epidermis (Typically about .5mm deep). Using it weekly can assist in product penetration and provide a mild mechanical exfoliation. It is not deep enough to induce significant collagen production. I repeat: It is not deep enough to induce significant collagen production.

If you are a consumer and you are looking for true collagen induction therapy to create truly visible changes in the skin, then you need medical microneedling. Medical micro needling involves needle depths of up to 3mm, creating micro channels that can touch the dermis (the deep layer of skin beneath the epidermis) stimulating collagen remodeling. This treatment requires lidocaine as well as a physician’s supervision as this is entering into the dermis. If you don’t need lidocaine, you aren’t going very deep. Medical micro needling causes bleeding. Sometimes, a lot of bleeding. In some of my patients when I really want to stimulate some remodeling I will use a technique known as stamping, in which I stamp the micro needling device over the skin, causing it to penetrate deeply in a very concentrated area. This should only be done by qualified estheticians operating under a physician’s license.

Three figures above are a medical micro needling device for professional use only.

Who is a great candidate for microneedling?

Patients looking for aggressive anti-aging, patients looking to treat skin laxity, hyperpigmentation and age spots, and it is an EXCELLENT modality for those with deep acne scars, enlarged pores, very textured skin and ice pick pores. I give my patients a series of 4 treatments spaced out every skin cycle (approximately every 4 weeks). After they have recovered from each treatment (downtime is typically 3-5 days) if they are happy with their results they only need to repeat this treatment once or twice per year! It has lasting effects. It can also be done off-label to different areas of the body such as areas with stretch marks! Anyone who suffers from cold sores will need a prophylactic prescription from a physician or PA prior to treatment, as micro needling can cause a flare up of this condition. It is not recommended to ever attempt medical micro needling at home- only by a trained professional, with experience, working under a physician.

Have more questions? Comment below! Thanks for stopping by! XO, Ashli

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